Port Erin Isle of Man

Chicken Rock Isle of Man

Passing Chicken Rock approach to Isle of Man

Early morning Monday 10 June we set off from Dunmore East County Waterford and motor-sailed  against a fresh southerly around Hook Lighthouse to follow the southern coast of Eire before turning NE into St. George’s Strait and into the Irish Sea.

Shortly after departing Dunmore East the bottom most sheet span attachment to the mainsail boom severed itself causing the span block to become detached and its adjoining sheet block to become jammed into the main sheet blocks on deck by the transom. I tied back the blocks to the wind vane assemblage to allow the sheet to run freely again and lowered the main sail by two panels to regain full control.

Southern tip of Isle of Man

Southern tip of Isle of Man

I contemplated re-attaching the lower sheet span at sea but then decided against it as the fuss and risk involved in working on a rig while under way didn’t seem worth the gain so we continued to sail NNE towards the Isle of Man with a full fore sail and a two panel reefed  main.

We made good passage under a fresh SW breeze and arrived in Port Erin Isle of Man early in the afternoon of Tuesday 11 June covering a distance of around 135 nautical miles in around 30 hours.

port of erin

Moored in Port of Erin

Once tied up to a secure visitor’s mooring buoy in Port Erin harbour I re-attached the lower sheet span to the boom with ease. The line had chafed itself against the steel track used to secure the sail. My new arrangement avoids that from happening.

Ara’Deg seems to be taking well to its new steel mast despite its formidable 350 kg weight. All in all the boat remains well balanced without being too tender. I am both pleased and relieved by its performance so far.

alison roeMy sailing partner Alison still suffered bouts of seasickness on this latest passage but not nearly as severe as the initial journey from  Wales to Eire – which indicates to me that her ‘sealegs’ are starting to grow :).

Our next planned excursion will be a 105 nautical mile journey from here, the Isle of Man, to Port Ellen on the Scottish island of Islay.  Assuming that wind predictions remain consistent, we will be off early Friday morning 14 June with a ETA of around 24 hours.

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