Islay to Colonsay and alterations

While anchored in Port Ellen, Islay I managed to finish a few alterations to the rig.

junk main sheet

first pull from the bottom twist

Regarding the main leech twist I reversed the order of the main sheet so that now the fist pull is from the top, not the bottom. As far as I can observe, this new arrangement has reduced the incidence of twist if not completely eliminated it yet. I have tried to unearth photographic evidence of this but have yet to get a good shot of the new arrangement. I did manage to discover a shot of the old first-pull-from-the-bottom sheeting arrangement and concomitant leech twist. I will attempt to capture photographic ‘proof’ of reduced twist with the new first-pull-from-the-top arrangement next time I sail off the wind to a sufficient degree.

Two improvements has been made to the foresail sheeting arrangement:

fore-sheet blocks junk

spaced fore-sheet blocks

First, I have separated the three deck sheet blocks from around one inch apart to around two inches apart. This new arrangement is to avoid the sheet parts getting tangled and locked up – particularly when the the sheet went slack during reefing and jybing (or jibing, or jibbing – not sure how to spell it – and automated spell checkers don’t comprehend sailing terminology ;)). The larger spacing seems to have worked and I have not experienced any jamming so far :).

fore-sail gallows

foresail gallows sheet deflector

The second improvement was introducing a fore-sheet gallows deflector so the sheets wouldn’t get stuck on the side of the fore gallows when jybing. I have observed from pictures of Jock MacLeod’s Ron Glas that half circle hoops were placed between leech and blocks to enable the sheet to slide from one side to the other without snagging on anything (like my neck, which I experienced when coming over from the Republic of Newfoundland last year).

I’m not sure what the hoops were constructed from but I think half inch pvc pipe would work well. Not having any plastic piping of sufficient length at and I have set up a “temporary” fix – fixing a line from the gunnels outside the life lines to the top of the gallows and then back down to the gunnels on the other side. Cheap, easy, fast – just like me. So far it actually seems to be working with no snags to report. (By the way, I place ‘temporary’ on quotation marks because some of my temporary fixes have been known to stay in situ for years ;).)

– – –

With the current addition of Caer Edin born Alison Roe to the journeys of Ara’ Deg, I acknowledge that the readership of this online chronicle may be expanding beyond Junk rig enthusiasts and those seeking information on the evolving technology of adapting Junk rigs to Western hulls – to include Alison’s North Atlantic fan base.

Accordingly, with the help of Alison I hope to expand the scope of this web log to include some info on our travels around the west coast of Scotland and increase its general ‘human interest’ aspect.

Tying it all together is the fact that the modern use and development of the Junk rig got its start in Scotland some 50 years ago with the pioneering efforts of Jock MacLeod and Blondie Hassler cumulating in their definitive work on the subject in 1987 – Practical Junk Rig. There is probably no more appropriate place in the world for a modern Junk-rigged schooner like Ara’ Deg to hang out. I’ve yet to observe another Junk-rig here but it’s still early days.

Port Askaig

Port Askaig

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

3 responses to “Islay to Colonsay and alterations

  1. Yawn.

  2. It’s “gybing”. πŸ™‚ *** at this point I double checked and looked it up on Wikipedia *** Actually, it seems like the term “jibe” is an accepted US spelling. But I’ve only seen it written as “gybe” in writing before. I guess you can choose for yourself. Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jibe

    • Yes, the Americans are a little more progressive when it comes to spelling words as they are actually pronounced. The most annoying confusion in the English language is the the pronunciation of the letter ‘c’. Don’t get me started πŸ˜‰

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s